"Why are you troubled?"

If living a stranger to Christ, you may well be troubled. The thought of death, and judgment to come; may well give you trouble. If this is your condition, God grant that your trouble may be greater and greater, until you find rest in Jesus.

This little paper may be put into the hands of a doubting Christian. To such an one these words of Jesus have peculiar application. (Luke 24:38, 39.) Jesus alive from the dead, speaks these words, "Why are ye troubled? and why do thoughts arise in your hearts? Behold my hands and my feet." What tender love is this! Blessed Jesus! He had said unto them, "Peace be unto you;" and it touched His tender heart that there should be trouble or a thought in their hearts! How could such deep, sincere love bear to be doubted? He had loved them unto death; His very body had been broken on the cross for them; His very blood had been shed for the remission of their sins; as their Substitute He had died the accursed death of the cross for them — the Just for the unjust. One had denied Him, and all had forsaken Him. But now God had raised Him from the dead, for their justification. And now the object of His eternal desire was accomplished — redemption was finished. His heart, overflowing with unutterable joy, had found vent in those ever-precious words, "Peace be unto you;" how could He then bear a cloud of trouble, or one doubting thought, in the hearts of those He had so loved? Oh! it makes my heart melt whilst I look at Jesus and hear those divinely sweet words, "Why are ye troubled? and why do thoughts arise in your hearts? Behold my hands and my feet."

My reader, do you believe that that agony and shameful death of Jesus, the spotless Son of God, on the cross, was for your sins — that He was delivered for your offences — and that, having endured their utmost penalty, God raised him from the dead for your justification? For this is true of every sinner that believeth. Yes, and if you are brought by the Holy Spirit thus to trust in Jesus alone, then it is true of you; and these words are written for you. With a heart still filled with joy, Jesus says, "Peace be unto you." Like Peter, you may have denied Him; or, like the rest, you may have forsaken Him; but look at Him, listen to Him; oh! what words of love — yes, love that cannot bear to be doubted; and words to you: "Why are ye troubled? and why do thoughts arise in your hearts?" How do you answer these words of Jesus? Do you say, I am such a vile, ungrateful sinner? He says, "Behold my hands and my feet;" now look at them, what do you think about those wounds on the risen body of Jesus? Do they not speak peace to your troubled conscience? "The blood of Jesus Christ cleanseth us from all sin." Oh! yes, my fellow-believer, Jesus feels keenly every doubting thought that arises in our hearts.

Blessed Jesus, Thy work is finished; here our souls rest. Our sins were laid on Thee; they cannot be laid on us. On our account wrath was on Thee; on Thy account it is peace, endless peace, to us.

May my reader hear the words of Jesus, "Go in peace, and doubt no more." He does not say, Look at your faith or your feeling — He does not say, Look at your sins or your failings. We might look at them in despair. But He says, "Behold my hands and my feet;" as though He had said, Is it not enough? could I love you more?

C.S.